Book Review | Sola Scriptura!: The Protestant Position on the Bible

Sola Scriptura!: The Protestant Position on the Bible
Sola Scriptura!: The Protestant Position on the Bible by Don Kistler
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Throughout Sola Scriptura the authors expound on what the authors argue is the key principle of The Reformation. The book compares and contrasts the Protestant doctrine of the sufficiency of Scripture for faith and life and what the Roman Catholic Church believes regarding Scripture, Tradition, and the role of the Church in the life of Catholic faith.

The Good
Each of the articles provides a clear explanation of Sola Scriptura and why it is important. The author(s) of each of the essays also do a good job of carefully representing the Catholic position by not cherry picking the “worst” examples from the “other side” and then blasting them for being wrong.

The final chapter does a great job challenging pastors/ministers responsible for leading churches to encourage a more bibliocentric approach in the life of the Church and individual believers. Sections pointing to and calling for a more Scripture-centered, gospel-saturated pulpit ministry were particularly challenging and worthy of another reading.

The Bad
At times the arguments were very dense.The comparisons between the two positions became difficult to follow and required a second reading. So, the reader should read carefully. The book is more academic on the whole, so this is less a criticism and more a point of information for those who decide to read it.

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Book Review: #OrganicJesus

#OrganicJesus
#OrganicJesus by Scott Douglas
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Irreverant. Funny. Provocative. Sincere. Challenging.

The Good
Scott Douglas does a great job of keeping you on the edge. He says things in a way that challenges you to think more deeply. He has a knack for seeing the ironies and the humor in the Christian subculture. But, he does this while a committed member and defender of that same community.

The Bad
There is not a lot. This book is not about theology per se. It does tackle some theological topics in general terms. This leaves the reader wondering what they should believe on the matter. It would have been nice for there to have a been a nudge toward other resources to dig deeper. But, in the end, this is not the purpose of the book.

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Book Review | The Complete Guide to Bible Translations: How They Were Developed – Understanding Their Differences – Finding the Right One for You

The Complete Guide to Bible Translations: How They Were Developed - Understanding Their Differences - Finding the Right One for You
The Complete Guide to Bible Translations: How They Were Developed – Understanding Their Differences – Finding the Right One for You by Ron Rhodes
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you are looking for a helpful, easy to read introduction to the background of the most popular Bible translations, this is the book for you. I will definitely be referring back to this volume.

The Good
The major issues surrounding Bible translation are covered in this book (translation philosophy, textual basis of each translation covered, gender-neutral language issues). The historyical context that caused each translation to be undertaken is provided. And, several benefits and cautions are provided for each translation.

The Bad
There is not much to complain about in this book. The author offers his own opinions, but they are measured and brief.

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Book Review | Translating Truth: The Case for Essentially Literal Bible Translation

Translating Truth: The Case for Essentially Literal Bible Translation
Translating Truth: The Case for Essentially Literal Bible Translation by Wayne A. Grudem
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Good
This collection of essays does a good job of making the case for the “essentially literal” Bible translation philosophy. I found the arguments compelling. The first three essays are worth the purchase of the book. The strongest case for the “essentially literal” approach are clearly presented.

The Bad
Making the case for a word-for-word philosophy does not need to descend into accusations of malpractice on the part of those that do not follow this approach. Grudem’s essay (the first essay) did this a few times (four or five times). It was unnecessary.

The final two essays were a little more technical and not as helpful. While these two did tease out the practical implementation of an essentially literal approach, it was a little hard to follow.

That being said, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in a clear and concise argument FOR the essentially literal translation approach.

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